sz.blackmilkmag.com
New recipes

Too Much Salt Damages Heart Muscles, Study Suggests

Too Much Salt Damages Heart Muscles, Study Suggests


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


It’s time to get serious about salt — according to one recent study published in the Journal of the American College of Caridology, the average U.S. We know that sodium is a problem. Sodium levels in restaurant food and fast-food takeout have flown through the roof and become an imminent concern for American health.

But with so many other health debates simmering, such as those surrounding chemical additives, GMOs, and gluten, salt has fallen silently off the radar. Well, the radar needs to relocate: Unlike the often-imaginary health consequences of gluten and dairy, salt’s effect on heart health is very real. And it’s very serious.

Diets with a high sodium content have been known for some time now to have an inflating influence on blood pressure — which, when it gets too high, can put a great deal of strain on the heart to efficiently pump blood. High blood pressure can lead to heart attacks and other coronary problems. However, conflicting research has also shown the opposite — that too little salt can result in an escalated risk of coronary disease. The health conversation got more and more confusing, and by and large, people gave up.

In the study, participants consumed a relatively minor amount of sodium — the equivalent of at least two teaspoons of salt. That’s around the same as the average American, at 3.73 grams per day. Those who consumed more than this amount were significantly more likely to show muscle strain and dangerous enlargement of the left chamber of the heart, where the organ pumps blood through the body.

The lead author of the study, Dr. Senthil Selvaraj, explained, “This study enhances our understanding of the adverse effects of salt intake on heart function.” He encourages those who consume a lot of sodium to make an effort to cut back. With cardiovascular disease reigning as the number one cause of death worldwide, it’s worth the effort.

So if too little salt is also harmful, how much salt should we be consuming? According to the World Health Organization, a safe bet is to aim for around 2 grams each day, or about one teaspoon of table salt. That doesn’t mean it’s advisable to pour an entire teaspoon over your dinner. It’s important to keep in mind that many popular foods — such as popcorn, soup, Chinese food, and dozens of others — contain a good amount of sodium already.

We’d also like to note that the study does not definitively prove that salt is bad for you, or that it causes heart attacks. The study was limited in that the majority of participants assessed were already overweight and experiencing high blood pressure, making them increasingly prone to fluctuation. So don’t go crazy on eating only foods that taste bland — just be mindful of how much you’re pouring over your meal.


How Much Sodium Should You Actually Eat? An RD Weighs In

Everything you need to know about this essential mineral.

You&aposve probably been told your entire life that too much sodium is bad for you. Now, new research suggests that a diet low in sodium may actually be harmful.

The collection of four studies, published in the journal The Lancet, followed more than 100,000 participants—some with high blood pressure, some without𠅏rom nearly 50 countries for almost four years. The researchers found that people with a low sodium intake (less than 3,000 mg) experienced a higher risk of heart attack, stroke, or heart failure, compared to people who consumed between 3,000 mg and 6,000 mg a day. That’s well above the current recommendations by the USDA of 2,300 mg for healthy adults, and 1,500 mg for those with hypertension or increased risk of high blood pressure.

The study has come under some scrutiny because the researchers assessed the participants&apos sodium levels via a single urine sample that was collected when the participants enrolled. Also, the data did not reveal a direct cause and effect it simply showed an association between lower sodium diets and increased risk of heart problems, leaving many questions unanswered.

In any case, the findings have fueled the ongoing sodium controversy. Just a few years ago, for example, a panel of top experts concluded that while Americans are consuming excess amounts of sodium, cutting back too much may do more harm than good. Meanwhile New York City is requiring restaurant chains to post sodium warning labels next to certain menu items. The USDA and American Heart Association continue to stand by the current sodium guidelines.

Clearly sodium isn&apost a cut and dry subject, and it can be challenging to sort through the latest info. Some of my clients are even confused about the basics, like what sodium is and why we need it. If you&aposre in the same boat, here are seven things you should know, including my advice for determining how to get just the right amount.


How Much Sodium Should You Actually Eat? An RD Weighs In

Everything you need to know about this essential mineral.

You&aposve probably been told your entire life that too much sodium is bad for you. Now, new research suggests that a diet low in sodium may actually be harmful.

The collection of four studies, published in the journal The Lancet, followed more than 100,000 participants—some with high blood pressure, some without𠅏rom nearly 50 countries for almost four years. The researchers found that people with a low sodium intake (less than 3,000 mg) experienced a higher risk of heart attack, stroke, or heart failure, compared to people who consumed between 3,000 mg and 6,000 mg a day. That’s well above the current recommendations by the USDA of 2,300 mg for healthy adults, and 1,500 mg for those with hypertension or increased risk of high blood pressure.

The study has come under some scrutiny because the researchers assessed the participants&apos sodium levels via a single urine sample that was collected when the participants enrolled. Also, the data did not reveal a direct cause and effect it simply showed an association between lower sodium diets and increased risk of heart problems, leaving many questions unanswered.

In any case, the findings have fueled the ongoing sodium controversy. Just a few years ago, for example, a panel of top experts concluded that while Americans are consuming excess amounts of sodium, cutting back too much may do more harm than good. Meanwhile New York City is requiring restaurant chains to post sodium warning labels next to certain menu items. The USDA and American Heart Association continue to stand by the current sodium guidelines.

Clearly sodium isn&apost a cut and dry subject, and it can be challenging to sort through the latest info. Some of my clients are even confused about the basics, like what sodium is and why we need it. If you&aposre in the same boat, here are seven things you should know, including my advice for determining how to get just the right amount.


How Much Sodium Should You Actually Eat? An RD Weighs In

Everything you need to know about this essential mineral.

You&aposve probably been told your entire life that too much sodium is bad for you. Now, new research suggests that a diet low in sodium may actually be harmful.

The collection of four studies, published in the journal The Lancet, followed more than 100,000 participants—some with high blood pressure, some without𠅏rom nearly 50 countries for almost four years. The researchers found that people with a low sodium intake (less than 3,000 mg) experienced a higher risk of heart attack, stroke, or heart failure, compared to people who consumed between 3,000 mg and 6,000 mg a day. That’s well above the current recommendations by the USDA of 2,300 mg for healthy adults, and 1,500 mg for those with hypertension or increased risk of high blood pressure.

The study has come under some scrutiny because the researchers assessed the participants&apos sodium levels via a single urine sample that was collected when the participants enrolled. Also, the data did not reveal a direct cause and effect it simply showed an association between lower sodium diets and increased risk of heart problems, leaving many questions unanswered.

In any case, the findings have fueled the ongoing sodium controversy. Just a few years ago, for example, a panel of top experts concluded that while Americans are consuming excess amounts of sodium, cutting back too much may do more harm than good. Meanwhile New York City is requiring restaurant chains to post sodium warning labels next to certain menu items. The USDA and American Heart Association continue to stand by the current sodium guidelines.

Clearly sodium isn&apost a cut and dry subject, and it can be challenging to sort through the latest info. Some of my clients are even confused about the basics, like what sodium is and why we need it. If you&aposre in the same boat, here are seven things you should know, including my advice for determining how to get just the right amount.


How Much Sodium Should You Actually Eat? An RD Weighs In

Everything you need to know about this essential mineral.

You&aposve probably been told your entire life that too much sodium is bad for you. Now, new research suggests that a diet low in sodium may actually be harmful.

The collection of four studies, published in the journal The Lancet, followed more than 100,000 participants—some with high blood pressure, some without𠅏rom nearly 50 countries for almost four years. The researchers found that people with a low sodium intake (less than 3,000 mg) experienced a higher risk of heart attack, stroke, or heart failure, compared to people who consumed between 3,000 mg and 6,000 mg a day. That’s well above the current recommendations by the USDA of 2,300 mg for healthy adults, and 1,500 mg for those with hypertension or increased risk of high blood pressure.

The study has come under some scrutiny because the researchers assessed the participants&apos sodium levels via a single urine sample that was collected when the participants enrolled. Also, the data did not reveal a direct cause and effect it simply showed an association between lower sodium diets and increased risk of heart problems, leaving many questions unanswered.

In any case, the findings have fueled the ongoing sodium controversy. Just a few years ago, for example, a panel of top experts concluded that while Americans are consuming excess amounts of sodium, cutting back too much may do more harm than good. Meanwhile New York City is requiring restaurant chains to post sodium warning labels next to certain menu items. The USDA and American Heart Association continue to stand by the current sodium guidelines.

Clearly sodium isn&apost a cut and dry subject, and it can be challenging to sort through the latest info. Some of my clients are even confused about the basics, like what sodium is and why we need it. If you&aposre in the same boat, here are seven things you should know, including my advice for determining how to get just the right amount.


How Much Sodium Should You Actually Eat? An RD Weighs In

Everything you need to know about this essential mineral.

You&aposve probably been told your entire life that too much sodium is bad for you. Now, new research suggests that a diet low in sodium may actually be harmful.

The collection of four studies, published in the journal The Lancet, followed more than 100,000 participants—some with high blood pressure, some without𠅏rom nearly 50 countries for almost four years. The researchers found that people with a low sodium intake (less than 3,000 mg) experienced a higher risk of heart attack, stroke, or heart failure, compared to people who consumed between 3,000 mg and 6,000 mg a day. That’s well above the current recommendations by the USDA of 2,300 mg for healthy adults, and 1,500 mg for those with hypertension or increased risk of high blood pressure.

The study has come under some scrutiny because the researchers assessed the participants&apos sodium levels via a single urine sample that was collected when the participants enrolled. Also, the data did not reveal a direct cause and effect it simply showed an association between lower sodium diets and increased risk of heart problems, leaving many questions unanswered.

In any case, the findings have fueled the ongoing sodium controversy. Just a few years ago, for example, a panel of top experts concluded that while Americans are consuming excess amounts of sodium, cutting back too much may do more harm than good. Meanwhile New York City is requiring restaurant chains to post sodium warning labels next to certain menu items. The USDA and American Heart Association continue to stand by the current sodium guidelines.

Clearly sodium isn&apost a cut and dry subject, and it can be challenging to sort through the latest info. Some of my clients are even confused about the basics, like what sodium is and why we need it. If you&aposre in the same boat, here are seven things you should know, including my advice for determining how to get just the right amount.


How Much Sodium Should You Actually Eat? An RD Weighs In

Everything you need to know about this essential mineral.

You&aposve probably been told your entire life that too much sodium is bad for you. Now, new research suggests that a diet low in sodium may actually be harmful.

The collection of four studies, published in the journal The Lancet, followed more than 100,000 participants—some with high blood pressure, some without𠅏rom nearly 50 countries for almost four years. The researchers found that people with a low sodium intake (less than 3,000 mg) experienced a higher risk of heart attack, stroke, or heart failure, compared to people who consumed between 3,000 mg and 6,000 mg a day. That’s well above the current recommendations by the USDA of 2,300 mg for healthy adults, and 1,500 mg for those with hypertension or increased risk of high blood pressure.

The study has come under some scrutiny because the researchers assessed the participants&apos sodium levels via a single urine sample that was collected when the participants enrolled. Also, the data did not reveal a direct cause and effect it simply showed an association between lower sodium diets and increased risk of heart problems, leaving many questions unanswered.

In any case, the findings have fueled the ongoing sodium controversy. Just a few years ago, for example, a panel of top experts concluded that while Americans are consuming excess amounts of sodium, cutting back too much may do more harm than good. Meanwhile New York City is requiring restaurant chains to post sodium warning labels next to certain menu items. The USDA and American Heart Association continue to stand by the current sodium guidelines.

Clearly sodium isn&apost a cut and dry subject, and it can be challenging to sort through the latest info. Some of my clients are even confused about the basics, like what sodium is and why we need it. If you&aposre in the same boat, here are seven things you should know, including my advice for determining how to get just the right amount.


How Much Sodium Should You Actually Eat? An RD Weighs In

Everything you need to know about this essential mineral.

You&aposve probably been told your entire life that too much sodium is bad for you. Now, new research suggests that a diet low in sodium may actually be harmful.

The collection of four studies, published in the journal The Lancet, followed more than 100,000 participants—some with high blood pressure, some without𠅏rom nearly 50 countries for almost four years. The researchers found that people with a low sodium intake (less than 3,000 mg) experienced a higher risk of heart attack, stroke, or heart failure, compared to people who consumed between 3,000 mg and 6,000 mg a day. That’s well above the current recommendations by the USDA of 2,300 mg for healthy adults, and 1,500 mg for those with hypertension or increased risk of high blood pressure.

The study has come under some scrutiny because the researchers assessed the participants&apos sodium levels via a single urine sample that was collected when the participants enrolled. Also, the data did not reveal a direct cause and effect it simply showed an association between lower sodium diets and increased risk of heart problems, leaving many questions unanswered.

In any case, the findings have fueled the ongoing sodium controversy. Just a few years ago, for example, a panel of top experts concluded that while Americans are consuming excess amounts of sodium, cutting back too much may do more harm than good. Meanwhile New York City is requiring restaurant chains to post sodium warning labels next to certain menu items. The USDA and American Heart Association continue to stand by the current sodium guidelines.

Clearly sodium isn&apost a cut and dry subject, and it can be challenging to sort through the latest info. Some of my clients are even confused about the basics, like what sodium is and why we need it. If you&aposre in the same boat, here are seven things you should know, including my advice for determining how to get just the right amount.


How Much Sodium Should You Actually Eat? An RD Weighs In

Everything you need to know about this essential mineral.

You&aposve probably been told your entire life that too much sodium is bad for you. Now, new research suggests that a diet low in sodium may actually be harmful.

The collection of four studies, published in the journal The Lancet, followed more than 100,000 participants—some with high blood pressure, some without𠅏rom nearly 50 countries for almost four years. The researchers found that people with a low sodium intake (less than 3,000 mg) experienced a higher risk of heart attack, stroke, or heart failure, compared to people who consumed between 3,000 mg and 6,000 mg a day. That’s well above the current recommendations by the USDA of 2,300 mg for healthy adults, and 1,500 mg for those with hypertension or increased risk of high blood pressure.

The study has come under some scrutiny because the researchers assessed the participants&apos sodium levels via a single urine sample that was collected when the participants enrolled. Also, the data did not reveal a direct cause and effect it simply showed an association between lower sodium diets and increased risk of heart problems, leaving many questions unanswered.

In any case, the findings have fueled the ongoing sodium controversy. Just a few years ago, for example, a panel of top experts concluded that while Americans are consuming excess amounts of sodium, cutting back too much may do more harm than good. Meanwhile New York City is requiring restaurant chains to post sodium warning labels next to certain menu items. The USDA and American Heart Association continue to stand by the current sodium guidelines.

Clearly sodium isn&apost a cut and dry subject, and it can be challenging to sort through the latest info. Some of my clients are even confused about the basics, like what sodium is and why we need it. If you&aposre in the same boat, here are seven things you should know, including my advice for determining how to get just the right amount.


How Much Sodium Should You Actually Eat? An RD Weighs In

Everything you need to know about this essential mineral.

You&aposve probably been told your entire life that too much sodium is bad for you. Now, new research suggests that a diet low in sodium may actually be harmful.

The collection of four studies, published in the journal The Lancet, followed more than 100,000 participants—some with high blood pressure, some without𠅏rom nearly 50 countries for almost four years. The researchers found that people with a low sodium intake (less than 3,000 mg) experienced a higher risk of heart attack, stroke, or heart failure, compared to people who consumed between 3,000 mg and 6,000 mg a day. That’s well above the current recommendations by the USDA of 2,300 mg for healthy adults, and 1,500 mg for those with hypertension or increased risk of high blood pressure.

The study has come under some scrutiny because the researchers assessed the participants&apos sodium levels via a single urine sample that was collected when the participants enrolled. Also, the data did not reveal a direct cause and effect it simply showed an association between lower sodium diets and increased risk of heart problems, leaving many questions unanswered.

In any case, the findings have fueled the ongoing sodium controversy. Just a few years ago, for example, a panel of top experts concluded that while Americans are consuming excess amounts of sodium, cutting back too much may do more harm than good. Meanwhile New York City is requiring restaurant chains to post sodium warning labels next to certain menu items. The USDA and American Heart Association continue to stand by the current sodium guidelines.

Clearly sodium isn&apost a cut and dry subject, and it can be challenging to sort through the latest info. Some of my clients are even confused about the basics, like what sodium is and why we need it. If you&aposre in the same boat, here are seven things you should know, including my advice for determining how to get just the right amount.


How Much Sodium Should You Actually Eat? An RD Weighs In

Everything you need to know about this essential mineral.

You&aposve probably been told your entire life that too much sodium is bad for you. Now, new research suggests that a diet low in sodium may actually be harmful.

The collection of four studies, published in the journal The Lancet, followed more than 100,000 participants—some with high blood pressure, some without𠅏rom nearly 50 countries for almost four years. The researchers found that people with a low sodium intake (less than 3,000 mg) experienced a higher risk of heart attack, stroke, or heart failure, compared to people who consumed between 3,000 mg and 6,000 mg a day. That’s well above the current recommendations by the USDA of 2,300 mg for healthy adults, and 1,500 mg for those with hypertension or increased risk of high blood pressure.

The study has come under some scrutiny because the researchers assessed the participants&apos sodium levels via a single urine sample that was collected when the participants enrolled. Also, the data did not reveal a direct cause and effect it simply showed an association between lower sodium diets and increased risk of heart problems, leaving many questions unanswered.

In any case, the findings have fueled the ongoing sodium controversy. Just a few years ago, for example, a panel of top experts concluded that while Americans are consuming excess amounts of sodium, cutting back too much may do more harm than good. Meanwhile New York City is requiring restaurant chains to post sodium warning labels next to certain menu items. The USDA and American Heart Association continue to stand by the current sodium guidelines.

Clearly sodium isn&apost a cut and dry subject, and it can be challenging to sort through the latest info. Some of my clients are even confused about the basics, like what sodium is and why we need it. If you&aposre in the same boat, here are seven things you should know, including my advice for determining how to get just the right amount.



Comments:

  1. Sobk

    Class! Respect to aftar!

  2. Dreogan

    I would like to encourage you to visit the site, with a huge number of articles on the subject that interests you. Can search for a link.

  3. Cheveyo

    This option does not suit me. Maybe there are more options?

  4. Kavian

    Wonderful, very funny idea

  5. Vudogar

    It is just a wonderful message

  6. Akinogore

    You are not right. I'm sure. I can defend my position. Email me at PM, we will talk.



Write a message